3 Persian foods for vegetarian that you must try

Adas polo

Rice is the most commonly eaten food in Iran. There are two main kinds of rice that have a vast number of varieties in Iranian cuisine: Polow and Chelow. Polow consists of vegetables or meat cooked and mixed with rice that makes delicious and popular dishes such as adas polo.

Adas Plow is a delicious combination of rice layered with lentils and a topping with raisins, ground beef and onions. However, some people prepare the topping without adding the ground beef and serve it as a vegetarian dish.

Adas polo

Gheimeh

Gheimeh (Persian: قیمه‎) is an Iranian stew (khoresh) consisting of mutton, tomatoes, split peas, onion and dried lime. The stew is garnished with aubergine or saffron flavored fried potatoes and is usually served with rice (polow).

Stews are not all about meat, this vegetarian recipe of Khoresht Gheymeh is full of flavor. Simply omit meat from classic recipe and top it with extra  french fries and use vegetable oil! that’s it! This stew is super delicious.

Gheimeh

Loobia polo

Rice is a staple of the Iranian diet. Different methods are applied in cooking rice. Chelow is a plain rice that is steamed. You can serve chelow with stews like ghormeh sabzi, khoresht karafs, khoresht gheimeh  and all kinds of meat and kebabs. Polow is  a persian dish that is cooked with vegetables, meat, chicken, and various kinds of beans like loobia polo and baghali polo. How to make a colorful and tasty loobia polo?

 

loobiya polo is made with a variety of recipes, for example, with chopped meat, chicken or soy, or like the one in this recipe, with ground beef.

Loobia polo

Cooking tips for Persian foods

  • Don’t use butter for high-temp cooking: “Never put olive oil or butter in a super hot pan ― it will burn very quickly (or worse, catch on fire). This is because they both have low smoke points, meaning they can burn very easily.”
  • Have all your ingredients prepped, measured, and ready : “It’s all about mise en place. Have all your ingredients cleaned, peeled, measured, chopped, and in separate containers before starting to cook.
  • If you do add too much salt: “If you go overboard with the salt when making soup, you can throw a quartered potato in and simmer for 10 minutes. The potato will absorb a good amount of salt and make the soup taste less salty.”
  • Don’t use old, expired spices: If you’re a beginner, you probably don’t have a lot of spices. But if you’ve had that paprika for 10 years, splurge on a new one. Come on, you deserve spices from this decade, don’t you?
  • Don’t put food in a cold pan: When you put meat into a cold pan, the meat is going to release moisture as it heats up. Unless you like gnawing on dry meat, heat your pan up first so your moisture stays in the meat and doesn’t escape too early. By preheating the pan first, you’re giving your meat a nice searing which holds in all those yummy juices.